The American Heart Association’s Local Heart & Stroke Walk Goes Virtual

The American Heart Association (heart.org) is embracing the new normal and moving its iconic annual Heart & Stroke Walk online, set for Saturday, May 30, in response to the recent coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic keeping more Americans at home. The Heart Walk, locally presented by University of Nebraska Medical Center, Nebraska Medicine, and the University of Nebraska at Omaha, is a fun and meaningful way to celebrate heart and stroke survivors, raise lifesaving funds, and encourage physical activity. The funds raised from the Heart Walk will go toward research, advocacy, CPR training, and promoting better health.

On Saturday, May 30, Omaha area Heart Walk participants and teams will not physically meet but are invited to get moving at home or around the neighborhood. Here are a few fun activities to consider choosing from:

  • Take a walk outside (while following current social distancing guidelines).
  • Get the whole family involved and have an indoor dance party.
  • Try out a few strengthening exercises like push-ups, lunges, and squats.
  • Create an at home circuit workout.

To register, visit www.OmahaHeartWalk.com. From there, participants can stay up to date by downloading the Heart Walk mobile app and can encourage friends and family to join in via email or on social media. On the day of, everyone is encouraged to wear their Heart Walk shirt and post pictures and videos to document your activity using #HeartWalkNE.

The American Heart Association is a relentless force for a world of longer, healthier lives. They are dedicated to ensuring equitable health in all communities. Through collaboration with numerous organizations and the support of millions of volunteers, they fund innovative research, advocate for the public’s health, and share lifesaving resources. The Dallas-based organization has been a leading source of health information for nearly a century. Connect with them on Facebook (@AmericanHeart) and Twitter (@American_Heart) or by calling 1-(800) AHA-USA1. Visit heart.org to learn more.